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The Gentoo Penguin. The Gentoo Penguin is easily distinguished by the wide white stripe which extends like a bonnet across the top of its head and the orange-red bill. Their webbed feet are a pale pinkish-white, and they possess a fairly long tail. In fact, it is the longest tail of any known species of penguin. They may attain a maximum height of as much as 3 feet (90 cm), making them the third largest of all known species of penguin. They may weigh as much as 19 pounds ( 8.5 kg). Underwater they are the fastest swimming penguins, capable of reaching speeds of up to 24 miles per hour (36 kph). They breed on numerous sub-Antarctic islands, such as South Georgia, The Falkland Islands, and the Kerguelin Islands. They prefer shallow coastal regions for their habitat. Their current numbers are roughly estimated at approximately 300,000. They feed primarily upon crustaceans such as krill, with fish and small squid comprising approximately 15% of their diet. Their principle natural predators are, orcas, sea lions and leopard seals. Though their numbers may seem large, the IUCN has them officially listed as Near Threatened because their numbers are declining rapidly. Adults sometimes make up to 450 dives in a single day looking for food. by OurBreathingPlanet

The Gentoo Penguin. The Gentoo Penguin is easily distinguished by the wide white stripe which extends like a bonnet across the top of its head and the orange-red bill. Their webbed feet are a pale pinkish-white, and they possess a fairly long tail. In fact, it is the longest tail of any known species of penguin. They may attain a maximum height of as much as 3 feet (90 cm), making them the third largest of all known species of penguin. They may weigh as much as 19 pounds ( 8.5 kg). Underwater they are the fastest swimming penguins, capable of reaching speeds of up to 24 miles per hour (36 kph). They breed on numerous sub-Antarctic islands, such as South Georgia, The Falkland Islands, and the Kerguelin Islands. They prefer shallow coastal regions for their habitat. Their current numbers are roughly estimated at approximately 300,000. They feed primarily upon crustaceans such as krill, with fish and small squid comprising approximately 15% of their diet. Their principle natural predators are, orcas, sea lions and leopard seals. Though their numbers may seem large, the IUCN has them officially listed as Near Threatened because their numbers are declining rapidly. Adults sometimes make up to 450 dives in a single day looking for food. by OurBreathingPlanet

(Source: trynottodrown)

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